Stanley Mauldin

PhD

Associate Professor of Biology/Biochemistry
Education

BA, University of North Carolina at Greensboro
MA, University of North Carolina at Greensboro
PhD, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Courses Taught

BIOL 415/ 416 Modern Concepts in Biochemistry I and II
BIOL 120 Biological Principles I
BIOL 209 Cell Biology
BIOL 330 General Immunology
BIOL 408 Cell and Molecular Techniques
BIOL 427/428 Research Internship
BIOL 206 Microbiology
CHEM 120/121 General Chemistry I and II
GSCI 106 Chemistry and the Environment
GSCI 107 Fundamental Concepts of Biology and Chemistry
GSCI 105 Living in the Environment

Teaching Focus or Philosophy

Students, especially students of the sciences, need to be challenged and actively involved in their education. For undergraduate education to have a long-lasting and meaningful impact on a student's life and career, it is the responsibility of the instructor to encourage the development of a student's scientific ideas by guiding the student in the areas of experimental design, outcome, and data analysis. Laboratories should be hands-on for every student, both individually and in groups; they should be open-ended, i.e. not necessarily finished within one lab period; they should call on the student's knowledge from other areas of scientific study; and they should require the students to report results formatted after peer-reviewed manuscripts. I feel that the newest technology (computers, the Internet and Web-based learning, data analysis and presentation software, etc.) should be used whenever possible to enhance the learning experience. Lastly, I think that it is important to involve all undergraduate biology majors in faculty research; for it is here that they get a real feel for the use of the scientific method as it relates to hypothesis, experimental design, troubleshooting, and data analysis/presentation.

Dissertation title: "Studies on the Biotransformation of Two Second Generation cis- Platinum Antitumor Drugs"

Publications

Mauldin, S.K., Getts, R.C., and Stamato, T.D. (2002) DNA-PK-Dependent Binding of DNA Ends to Plasmids Containing Nuclear Matrix Attachment Region DNA Sequences: Evidence for Assembly of a Repair Complex. Nucleic Acids Res., 30: 4075-4087.

Ostrowski, R. and S.K. Mauldin (2006) The Expression of the RAD51 Gene during the Growth and Differentiation of the Cellular Slime Mold, Dictyostelium discoideum. Presented at the National Conference for Undergraduate Research (NCUR) held at the University of North Carolina at Asheville, April 2006.

Thomas, C. and S. K. Mauldin (2008) Analysis of PSO2 Gene Expression During Differentiation and After DNA Damage in the Cellular Slime Mold, Dictyostelium discoideum. Presented at the National Conference for Undergraduate Research (NCUR) held at Salisbury University, Salisbury, MD, April 2008.

Smith, R., Burns, M., Mauldin, S.K., and Cordero, R.E. (2011) Analysis of Anti-Bacterial Properties and Cytological Location of Allelochemicals in Several Varieties of Hosta. Proceedings of the National Conference on Undergraduate Research (NCUR), Ithaca College, Ithaca, NY.

Yorty, B. and S. K. Mauldin (2013) Analysis of Pso4 gene expression upon interstrand crosslink damage in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Presented at the National Conference for Undergraduate Research (NCUR) held at Weber State University, Ogden, UT, April, 2013.

Awards and Honors

2006 Ray Taylor Memorial Award for Faculty Development, for the project "The Role of the PSO4 Protein and the Nuclear Matrix in the Repair of DNA Damage during Growth and Differentiation in Dictyostelium discoideum.

2011 Ray Taylor Memorial Award for Faculty Development, for the project "Chemical Ecology using Hosta Lilies" with Dr. Robert Cordero.

2012 Ray Taylor Memorial Award for Faculty Development, for the project "Computational Analysis of Structure and Biological Function of Translesion DNA Polymerase Zeta from Dictyostelium discoideum", with Dr. Dian He.

Additional Info

My area of research involves the understanding of the mechanisms of DNA interstrand crosslink repair in both dividing cells and cells that have undergone differentiation. I use as my model system the cellular slime mold, Dictyostelium discoideum. As a developmental model system, this organism allows me to study repair both during active cell growth and during differentiation and development.

Stanley Mauldin
Contact
Office: 406B HFH
Phone: 267-341-3556