News

Alternative Spring Break Sends Students to Oklahoma City With Habitat for Humanity

habitat for humanity hfuFor the 10th year in a row, Holy Family University students looking for a twist on the traditional spring break experience will travel to Oklahoma City, Oklahoma to participate in a Habitat for Humanity building event.

From March 6–13, students and chaperones will help construct homes for a new development, Legacy Estates, in Oklahoma City. The homes are built to help individuals struggling with poverty in the surrounding area.

“This isn’t a handout,” Mike McNulty-Bobholz, Assistant Vice President for Student Life said. “It is a way to get out of poverty. Habitat for Humanity helps with home ownership and with the mortgage.”

Chaperones and students alike are responsible for fundraising the entire trip, with a goal of $20,000 being set at the beginning of the year. Through campus-wide events like Pizza and Pins, Bingo, and letter writing campaigns, the group has raised roughly half of that number.

During their weeklong trip, HFU students will attempt to build a complete home, but every building site brings its own set of challenges and goals.

“In Washington, we started with just a concrete slab,” McNulty-Bobholz said. “By the end of the week, we had all the rooms framed, the outside walls framed, and the framing for the roof was being placed. Did we build a whole house? No—but we do get far. In Texas, we had to do a lot of rehab. We cleaned out yards, as well as a house that was infested with roaches. Every year is a different story. On top of this, we also work with Philadelphia. On Friday, February 12, we are doing a day of service with the Habitat for Humanity Philadelphia branch and on February 20, we will be working with the Bucks County Habitat for Humanity.”

Throughout the years, the trip has been a way for students to learn and grow outside of the classroom.

“This is a life-changing experience,” McNulty-Bobholz said. “Every student that has gone has said that once it is done, they have been changed in some way. Some see how lucky they are to have the possessions they live with every day.”

One of the reasons students are drawn to the Alternative Spring Break program year after year is two-fold. The trip provides students with an alternative way of learning and growing, while at the same time, providing richer meaning to the Core Values of Holy Family University.

“This program is the flesh and bones of our Core Values at Holy Family University,” McNulty-Bobholz said. “It has Family, where we become a very united group throughout the journey. It is the 24 of us working and building together, and not always being happy with one another, but getting through the challenge while still having Respect for each other. There is Integrity—every site we go to, the last thing we hear is ‘I hope you guys can come back because you were really hard workers.’ There is Vision—the students see the vision of having no money for the trip, and turning that into the $20,000 needed to go and support future trips. Then Learning—a lot of the students have never flown before, never left their parents before. A lot of them never used a power tool of any kind. Finally, the trip itself is about Service and showing Responsibility for your fellow man. There are great growth stories of students who once they go on this trip, come back as a new person.”

Individuals wishing to help support the student’s trip to Oklahoma are encouraged to email Mike McNulty-Bobholz directly at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

Lions, Tigers, and Bears—Oh My!

rp primary TOY DRIVEHoly Family University (Tigers) in conjunction with Bloomfield College (Bears) and Georgian Court University (Lions) will be hosting toy drives during the month of February to collect stuffed animals. Each school will then donate the stuffed animals to their local children's hospitals.
 
Holy Family will be donating its stuffed animals to The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.
 
During the men's and women's basketball doubleheader on Wednesday, Feb. 17 versus Chestnut Hill College, anyone who brings a stuffed animal to be donated will receive free admission. 
 
General admission that night will be $5 with all proceeds going towards the stuffed animal toy drive and The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Holy Family students, faculty and staff with valid university ID will be admitted free. In addition, those that would like to purchase a stuffed animal at the game can donate $2 and will be able to take part in an in-game event.  
 
During a particular point in each game, fans will be allowed to toss the donated stuffed animal onto the court. Athletics staff will then collect the stuffed animals off the court so the game could resume.  
 
For more information on the stuffed animal toy drive please contact Tim Hamill, Special Events Coordinator, at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

The original article publicizing this event can be accessed by clicking here, or by visiting Holy Family University Athletics.

February Art Gallery - Nationalism: Belonging/Not Belonging

art galleryHoly Family University Art Gallery Presents Nationalism: Belonging/Not Belonging

Exhibit Dates: February 9 - March 1, 2016

Panel Discussion: February 23, 2016 3-4 pm in the ETC Lobby followed by an artist reception from 4-6 pm in the Art Gallery.

On Tuesday, February 23, Holy Family University will host a panel discussion titled Citizenship, Belonging and Nation-States in the 21st Century, in conjunction with its February Art Gallery event, Nationalism: Belonging/Not Belonging.

Eleven artists from across the United States will be exhibiting works that address the topic of Nationalism: Belonging /Not Belonging.

Exhibiting Artists: Kristen Miologos, Lidia C. Hasenauer, Gail Morrison-Hall, Stephen Marc, Robert Fields, Howard Hao Tran, Robert Knight, Calcagno Cullen, Howard Skrill, Pamela Flynn, and George Masry Isaac.

Panel Discussion: Citizenship, Belonging and Nation-States in the 21st Century. Editors Nicole Stokes-DuPass and Ramona Fruja will lead a panel discussion about the major themes of the book. Specifically, they will articulate why nation-states still matter in citizenship studies. The authors assert that nation-states continue to hold the unique capacity to determine who has the right to have rights. They also plan to discuss how states actively shape the assimilation outcomes and experiences of belonging among the populations who reside within its borders.

Nicole Stokes-DuPass, Associate Dean for School of Arts and Sciences/Associate Professor of Sociology, Holy Family University

Stokes-DuPass is a political sociologist and an accomplished educator with over 15 years of experience and expertise in teaching diverse student populations. Stokes-DuPass’ research focuses on the state, international migration, citizenship, social integration and Scandinavian and European studies. Her recent book, Integration and New Limits on Citizenship Rights: Denmark and Beyond (2015) is published with Palgrave-MacMillan.

Stokes-DuPass previously served as a U.S. Fulbright Fellow at Roskilde University and Guest Researcher at the Danish Institute for Social Research in Copenhagen, Denmark from 2000-2001 and in 2008. She has also previously served as a Dissertation Fellow for the American-Scandinavian Foundation to Denmark in 2008 and has also conducted research abroad in Russia, Germany and Cuba.

Ramona Fruja, Assistant Professor of Education, Bucknell University

Fruja has a dual doctoral degree in Sociology and Education and teaches courses on immigration, social contexts of schooling, and multicultural education. Her research is interdisciplinary and examines the intersections among immigration and identity, focusing on educational contexts and citizenship, particularly immigrants' experiences with education and citizenship in their multiple forms. She has presented her work at professional conferences internationally and has published in Globalizations; The International Handbook of Migration Studies (Routledge), Immigrants in American History: Arrival, Adaptation and Integration. She is also the co-editor of Social studies and diversity teacher education: What we do and why we do it (Routledge).

The event will take place at Holy Family University’s Education Technology Center (ETC) in the lobby and art gallery. Parking is available to all in the Campus Center parking lot in the visitor section without restriction.

Special Education Professor Brings First Hand Experience into the Classroom

gerryarangoGerry Arango didn’t initially intend for her musings on life to evolve into a memoir, but she knew she had something to say. A mother to a son with special needs and a caregiver to her own mother who is battling dementia, Arango’s writing was a cathartic way to deal with challenges she was facing as a mother, daughter, and friend. Now, the author of What Would Nola Do? What My Mother Taught Me about Showing Up, Being Present, and the Art of Caregiving, is combining what she teaches in the classroom with her day-to-day experiences as a caregiver.

Arango sat down with Holy Family University to discuss her classroom philosophy, her journey through writing a book, and her role in the second annual Caregiving Symposium taking place on February 13 at Holy Family University.

HFU: A lot of what you teach focuses on the topic of inclusion. Why are you so dedicated to this concept?

GA: “I started out as a special education teacher. I taught for several years, and then went back to graduate school because I was interested in educational technology. My specific interest was in assistive technology, which is technology that assists individuals with disabilities. When I had my second child, who was born with a disability, I became not just a special education teacher, but also a parent to a child with special needs, and technology became even more of a passion because my son uses assistive technology. When it comes to inclusion, it is really about the support we give to kids with disabilities, in order to enable them to be a part of everyday life, to have a meaningful life. That’s what we strive for and the philosophy behind our program at Holy Family University. Children naturally belong together, and as teachers, we need to be able to facilitate that, as well as get the support needed for these kids and ourselves.”

HFU: Can you tell me more about assistive technology? What type of items would fall under that term?

GA: “All kinds of stuff! Assistive technology really is any item that is used to support people with disabilities in their everyday lives. It can be high-tech devices that enable a person to communicate. It can also be iPad technology, which has been a game changer for individuals in this field. It can also be something as simple as a pencil grip for kids who are having trouble writing. It is the high-tech, mid-tech, low-tech, or no-tech item that can help a person with a disability to be successful.

HFU: How has the topic of inclusion and special education care evolved over the years, and how has that affected the way that you teach?

GA: “It’s funny—when I first came to Holy Family University, inclusion seemed like a much more exotic concept to the students. Now our undergraduate and graduate students have experienced going to school with kids who have disabilities, because that’s what we have been trying to make happen all these years—and it has. Our students can talk about their experiences with special needs individuals as friends and classmates and the type of support they had or didn’t have. Because there is more of a focus on inclusion, our work at Holy Family is about getting our students to understand the history, values, and legalities of why, as teachers, we must support all our learners. Our work is giving them the knowledge, skills, and experiences as well. It is exciting because the more inclusion happens in real life, the more our students can connect to it and continue to foster it. Our graduate students are often in the trenches teaching, and they come back for additional certifications because they know they need all the tools they can get in order to support all of their students most effectively.”

HFU: Your teaching also focuses a lot on caregiving, which was the topic of your book, What Would Nola Do? What My Mother Taught Me about Showing Up, Being Present, and the Art of Caregiving. How has being a 24/7 caregiver influenced your teachings?

GA: “The whole book started out because of circumstances in a three year span of my life. I had a friend who sustained a traumatic brain injury in a car accident. At the same time, my mother was slipping into dementia. As I was trying to support them, I realized I was drawing on many of the things I learned from supporting my son since birth. I started writing to help myself and little by little it was crafted into something that was eventually published. I try to communicate, often through my own child’s stories, that it’s really about trying to help people have a meaningful life and getting them to value the role we can play in supporting one another. Everybody has something they struggle with. If we all recognize what we have in common, it doesn’t have to be so exotic.”

HFU: Can you tell me more about the process of writing and publishing your book? It seemed as if the book was written more as a cathartic experience, with no real intention of having it published in the first place.

GA: “When I started writing, I had a different idea in mind for a book—a little dream—and I just started to write. I didn’t want to self-publish the book. I wanted someone who could read it without my emotional attachment to its words. I had many readers along the way—colleagues, friends, and family—who gave me wonderful suggestions for improvement and lots of encouragement. I went to conferences and read about writing, but I needed a publisher, an agent, someone! I’m a fan of William Stillman, who presents on the topic of autism, and I often check his website for material for my classes. Serendipitously, I was on Bill’s website one day, and it mentioned that he was the Editor-in-Chief of SilverXord Publications. It also said that he was looking for article submissions. I responded and told him I had articles, but he added that I could also send anything book length as well. A light bulb went off in my head, and I sent him what I had—my ‘manuscript.’ A week later, I got a phone call from him, and we had a conversation about the book. Bill was the one who pulled out the title. The phrase, ‘What would Nola do?’ kept coming up in the manuscript. My mother, Nola, even now, is a very charming woman, and she was always wise, funny, large-and-in-charge. Because I am none of those things, I would often repeat that phrase to myself to get confidence! The manuscript went through all the phases of turning into a book, including the design of the cover, by my sister, Gail Anderson, a nationally recognized graphic designer. The tail comb, eyebrow pencil, and little pink roller are on the book jacket as a little representation of our mother. The book will tell you what that’s about, but it’s a loving tribute to Nola, especially the eyebrow pencil. She always joked with us that when she died, if she didn’t have her eyebrows drawn on, she was going to come and haunt us. She was and still is quite a character!”

HFU: Looking towards the Caregiving Symposium on February 13, what are your goals for that event?

GA: “What we tried to do is make the Symposium a combination of things. Caregivers are often very challenged to take time for themselves—I can attest to that. We wanted to make the event a morning that would provide caregivers ways to better support someone, as well as have self-care pieces, where these people who do so much for others can take a morning away and learn how to take care of themselves a little better. You can come get a massage and have a red velvet cupcake because it is Valentine’s Day weekend. As a person who is a working mother, a widow, a caregiver for a young man with a disability, a daughter, and a full-time professor, I know it is hard to take time for yourself. We’re hoping the Symposium can be a little space for learning, relaxation, and being pampered a bit too!”

HFU: Can you tell us how the first Caregiving Symposium came about last year and what you brought away from it?

GA: “What Would Nola Do?” was published in June of 2014. This event was originally going to be celebrated by a book signing, but we realized that caregiving was a much bigger topic than could be held in a book. I worked with the School of Education and the Marketing and Communications Department, and our first Symposium was held in April 2015. It was small, but well received, and we decided to hold another this year because the topic of caregiving is touching so many lives. You either are a caregiver, you will be a caregiver, or you will need a caregiver at some time in your life. Doesn’t that say it all?”

Faculty Presents Research on Blended Learning and Co-Occurrence at Scholar’s Forum

The Spring 2016 Scholar’s Forum will be held on Monday, February 15 at 12:50 pm in the ETC Auditorium. Michael W. Markowitz, Vice-President for Academic Affairs, remarked that the presentations this semester “reflect a diversity of scholarship and research from across the University.”

This year’s presenters include Drs. Roseanna Wright, Maria Agnew and Brian Berry, whose work is titled "Assessing and Meeting the Needs of University Students in Blended Course Learning." Dr. Jan Buzydlowski will also be presenting his work, titled "Co-occurrence Analysis, or Two Authors Walk into a Bar."

Drs. Wright, Agnew, and Berry looked at the use of blended learning—a combination of face-to-face paired with an online component—with individuals with disabilities.

The authors write, “As faculty begin to implement more blended learning options, they need to develop both the awareness of the key principles of on-line learning and the impact this type of learning has on learners with disabilities.”

Because of its growing numbers of diagnoses, the authors specifically looked at individuals who identified as having autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

“Autism is classified as a social learning disability, making a traditional classroom setting potentially socially difficult for a student with ASD,” the authors write. “Beyond identifying support services for students with ASD through disabilities services, it is important to design higher education learning environments to meet the academic and social needs of these students, through a universally designed blended course format.”

Dr. Buzydlowski will examine the use of co-occurrence and its everyday use in our lives.

“I've worked in a few veins of research over the years, one of which was my dissertation research on author co-citation analysis and another is data mining,” Buzydlowski said. “Recently, I realized that most of my research involves the same thing: co-occurrence. I think it is interesting in that when you put on co-occurrence glasses, you see co-occurrences everywhere—things you put in your shopping cart, the books you buy from Amazon, the movies you watch on Netflix, or your Facebook friends. What my talk will focus on is the definition of co-occurrence, and how it can serve as a unifying framework to various methodologies within various fields to analyze ordinary items.”

HFU Instructor Parlays Sports Background into Teaching Opportunity

RiccaboniWhat do you get when you cross a professional wrestling announcer, a Philadelphia Phillies TV personality, an author, and a pharmaceutical rep? If you couldn’t figure it out—you’re probably not alone.

However, the students in the Introduction to Sports Media class are getting all of these things rolled into one, in the form of their professor, Ian Riccaboni. An announcer for the professional wrestling company Ring of Honor, a TV personality for Phillies Nation TV on The Comcast Network, and author of Phillies Nation Presents The 100 Greatest Phillies of All Time, Riccaboni is bringing his sports background to Holy Family University, where he made his teaching debut this semester.

We sat down with Riccaboni as he discusses his sports background and his introduction into the teaching world.

HFU: Where are you originally from?

IR: “I was born and raised in Allentown, PA. My wife Sarah and I have lived in Glenside, PA now for about three years, and we love it. We have the best neighbors, are excited about how our neighborhood is growing, and love being near the Keswick Theater, where some great musicians and comedians perform.”

HFU: What is your educational background?

IR: “I earned a Bachelor’s of Science in Media and Communications from New York University and a Master’s of Science in Education from the University of Pennsylvania.”

HFU: Besides teaching, announcing wrestling, and talking about the Phillies, is there anything else you do?

IR: “I am actually involved in Pharmaceutical Access and Reimbursement as a Field Reimbursement Manager. It is an amazingly rewarding job where I am able to connect with doctor’s offices and let them know ways patients are able to afford their treatment regiments. Because of the job, I have been able to travel to places I likely would never have been able to go otherwise like Sioux Falls, SD; Saranac Lake, NY; and my favorite city to visit, Omaha, NE.”

HFU: What made you want to get into teaching and that Holy Family University was where you wanted to do it?

IR: “Brian Michael is an instructor at Holy Family University and we talked a bit about my desire to teach. I always asked him to let me know if an opening popped up. I was in Nashville visiting with family after a Ring of Honor event and I hadn’t spoken to Brian in a few weeks. I texted him offering to be a guest speaker, something we had discussed in the past, for Spring 2016. He told me, ‘Hang tight. I might be sending you something, soon.’ Sure enough, there was an opening to teach Introduction to Media Relations in Sport, a class he had taught, and I couldn’t apply fast enough!”

HFU: How did you get involved with Ring of Honor?

IR: “I have been a professional wrestling fan for as long as I can remember. Working with ROH came through a series of serendipitous meetings and occurrences. Through Phillies Nation TV on Comcast Network, I was interviewing famous Phillies fans. I interviewed former WWE and ECW star The Blue Meanie, and he suggested we use the Monster Factory in Paulsboro, NJ as the backdrop. We filmed the segment, and I asked Danny Cage, the owner of the Monster Factory, how someone would get involved doing interviews and commentary. He told me to show up on a certain date and time and I went. I cut a couple 60-second promos, and then Kevin Kelly and “Brutal” Bob Evans talked to me about starting to come to some of the ROH shows. I started out as ring crew and then called my first match for them a few months later in Nashville.”

HFU: Switching to baseball, can you tell me about how you linked up with TCN to talk about the Phillies?

IR: “Phillies Nation TV on The Comcast Network is something I am very proud to be a part of. If you have ever seen that diagram of the tip of the iceberg that is going around on social media, where everyone sees just the tip, the visible success, but nobody sees what is underwater, the struggle, the elbow grease, that’s what the show has been and what has made it so rewarding.

Pat Gallen, now of CBS 3 Philly, and Corey Seidman, now of Comcast SportsNet, were filming web shorts with excellent production values with Brian Michael from Holy Family University, who runs Phillies Nation. I had just come aboard as a writer for the site and suggested airing a full-length show on Allentown’s Service Electric TV 2.

The meetings went well and we started airing there in 2012 and the following year, we latched on with Comcast Network with replays on Comcast SportsNet. I was really bad on camera in my first couple interviews. Really, truly horrible—but I believe that if you work hard enough, you can do anything.”

HFU: Can you tell me more about your book, Phillies Nation Presents The 100 Greatest Phillies of All Time? What made you want to chronicle the best Phillies to ever play the game?

IR: “With the book, it kind of happened by accident. In November 2013, Pat, Corey, and I met to discuss potential topics for the site and we talked about a countdown of the 100 greatest Phillies. I made an initial list and Pat and I worked on it pretty extensively to try to come up with a fair assessment of each player.

My mother-in-law, Barbara Morris, is an award-winning editor and after Pat believed that I had enough to make a book out of, I connected with Barb and asked her to edit what I had. I had no intentions of writing a book but am very happy with how it turned out!”

HFU: Now that you’re in the classroom at HFU teaching Sports Media, how can you take everything you’ve done—from ROH to the Phillies to authoring a book—and incorporate it into a lesson plan for the students?

IR: “The biggest thing that I hope to incorporate into lessons for the students is teaching them from my mistakes. I did an interview with Pete Orr once where I broke every unwritten journalism rule ever, including insulting the interview subject by complete accident. I want to tell them those stories—tell them how I learned by failing but also helping them avoid some of the pitfalls I faced.”

HFU: What is your teaching philosophy? What do you want the students to be able to say at the conclusion of your course?

IR: “At the end of this course, I hope that the students recognize the role media plays in the popularity of sport and how sports use the media to influence consumers. It is a very mutually beneficial relationship that is now morphing as social media allows athletes to go directly to their fans. I want them to be able to dissect a sports broadcast and explain the ‘who, what, where, when, why, and how” of all the elements—such as interviews and video packages.”

 

Second Annual Caregiving Symposium to be Held on February 13

Caregiving Symposium: February 13, 2016, 8:30 am12:00 pm
The symposium is free and open to the public.

Rosalynn Carter once said, "You have either been a caregiver, you are a caregiver, you will be a caregiver, or someone will care for you."

Caregiving touches us all at some point in our lives. Sponsored by the School of Education, Holy Family University's Second Annual Caregiving Symposium, is an opportunity to learn about practical, personal, and financial issues that are part of the caregiving experience. Drawing on the expertise of many disciplines, the Symposium will provide informative workshops and presentations on caring for others who experience complications of aging, disability, or trauma as well as caring for the all-important caregiver.

Join us on Holy Family University's Philadelphia Campus (9801 Frankford Ave, Philadelphia, PA 19114) in the Education and Technology Center for a morning designed just for you, the caregiver.

We'd also like to offer a special thanks to our event partners: Networks for Training and Development, Philadelphia Office of Developmental Programs, and Philadelphia Coordinated Health Care.

Register at http://www.holyfamily.edu/caregiving-symposium-form

Session Descriptions

Keynote: Caregiving–We All Have a Story
Gerry Anderson Arango, School of Education
Gerry Anderson Arango is the author of the memoir, What Would Nola Do? What My Mother Taught Me about Showing Up, Being Present and the Art of Caregiving. A professor of special education at Holy Family University, Gerry will share her story and offer insights into the many facets – physical, emotional and spiritual – of caregiving as parent, daughter and friend.

Critical Conversations about Financing Long-Term Care
J. Barry Dickinson, School of Business Administration and Extended Learning
Barry Dickinson's presentation will focus on long-term care from a financial perspective. 70% of individuals, over the age of 65, will require some form of long term care for at least three years in their lives. But how many of us plan for this almost inevitable reality? How much does long term care cost? Who does, and does not, pay for it? What is the best way to financially plan for your future care? When should you start planning?

Growing Old Together: Assisting Our Aging Parents with Respect
James R. Huber, PhD, LMFT, School of Arts and Sciences
In this upbeat, interactive one-hour program, Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist Jim Huber will affirm the challenge of assisting aging parents and offer ten practical tips for managing this important relationship with both respect and results.

Relaxation Room:
Taking Care of Yourself: The Mind, Body, and Spirit Connection

Jessica Stover, MS, ATP – Networks for Training and Development, Inc.
How can we more fully connect to life, events, and people around us when everything seems to be in constant motion? Join Jill and Jessica as we explore ways everyone can take a breath (literally!), become more grounded and centered, and be more present and engaged in activities and relationships that are the heart and soul of our well-being.

Advocacy 101
Linda Thompson, PhD, LPC
Caregivers often feel they need a voice in advocating for their rights and in understanding how to navigate complex systems of care and options. This session will discuss how caregivers can access advocates, find information on caregiver supports, and become active voices for change and support for each other.

Stress Reduction
Christopher Walcott, DC, Advanced Wellness Center of PA
This fun and informative presentation will outline some of the primary stresses experienced by caregivers, with immediate take home techniques for stress management. Dr. Walcott will go over the primary stressors, broken into the categories of emotional, chemical, and physical.  With each category, he will give real and effective techniques to manage the issues, including take home tools.

Creating Your Wellness Vision & Wellness Toolbox: Self Care for the 21st Century
Linda L Weihbrecht, BSN, RN, LMT, Certified Clinical Aromatherapist
This training provides information on Stress Management with special emphasis on the stress response. The participant will gain knowledge about types of stressors, symptoms and effects of stress, positive and negative stress, and coping strategies and tips to reduce stress. Interactive workshop.

Wellness: Balance Your Mind, Body & Soul Using Chair Yoga and Meditation
Mary Wombwell EdD, RN, CNE | Boas Yu,  EdD, RN, FNP-BC, CNE, GCNS
School of Nursing and Allied Health Professions
Both yoga and meditation, when used consistently, have proven health benefits. Especially when practicing yoga and meditation together, the mind-body connection can be strengthened, improving overall fitness and well-being. They are both very portable and easy to learn. Chair yoga will be presented in the first half of the session; and meditation will be practiced in the second half. If you prefer to bring your mat, cushion, or blanket, please feel free.

Advanced Care Planning: A Guide to Caring For Your Loved One and Yourself
Melissa Wombwell-Twersky, LSW, CMC, Geriatric Care Manager, Geriatric Care Consulting
This presentation will provide a guide to caring for the elderly population and will cover several areas, including an explanation of long term care options (retirement community, home care, adult day care). Discussion will also include how this care is financed. The next area covered will be community resources that are available to seniors and how to access them. The third area will include information on advance directives including Living wills, Power of Attorney documents, Do Not Resuscitate orders, and what kind of assistance elder care lawyers can provide. The last area covered will include information on end of life care including hospice and palliative care. Funeral planning, support group information, and caregiver resources for self-care will also be provided.

Volunteer Opportunities Announced For Charter Week Day of Service

The 62nd Annual Charter Celebration will conclude with a University-wide day of service on Friday, February 12. Events will take place at Philadelphia Habitat for Humanity, Feast of Justice, Mount Nazareth Retirement Home, assisting with a local election phone bank, and a canned food drive for Philabundance.

Habitat for Humanity Build | 8:30 am - 4:30 pm | Limited to eight people
Transportation will be provided from the Northeast campus. All participants must bring their own lunch. Participants must arrive at 7:15 am to complete paperwork and take the van to the site.

Feast of Justice | 8:30 am - 2 pm | Limited to 12 people
Transportation will be provided from the Northeast campus to help with weekly regular food distribution. All participants must bring their own lunch. Participants must arrive at 8:00 am to complete paperwork and to take the van to the site.

Volunteer Phone Bank | 5 pm - 8 pm | Limited to eight people
Transportation will be provided from the Northeast campus. Participants will work with John Sabatina's election campaign in a phone bank to reach out to people in this demographic to remind them of the importance of voting in primary elections, especially in the city of Philadelphia, where primary elections largely dictate representation.

Visiting the CSFN Sisters | 2 pm - 4 pm | Limited to four people
Transportation will be provided from the Northeast campus to Mount Nazareth Retirement Home to distribute a rose as a token of appreciation for their years of service and dedication to the University.

Cake for Kids | 1 pm - 3 pm | Limited to 25 people
Participants will decorate cakes for children who are less fortunate. The cakes will then be distributed to various food banks within the local area. The event will take place on Holy Family University's Main Campus in the Education and Technology Center Room 405.

Canned Food Drive
In a joint effort with Philabundance, Holy Family University will be collecting various can goods throughout the week and will deliver them to the South Philadelphia outlet.

Assignments to each volunteer site will be based on a first-come, first-served basis. Interested participants need to sign up by clicking here. Staff members must seek approval from their supervisors. Students must request an excused absence from their instructor.

 

Cold Mountain Selected as 2016 One Book, One Philadelphia Featured Read

Cold MountainHoly Family University will be participating in One Book, One Philadelphia for the second year in a row. The reading event is designed by the Free Library of Philadelphia to “promote reading, literacy, and libraries, and to encourage the entire greater Philadelphia area to come together through reading and discussing a single book.”

Cold Mountain, written by Charles Frazier, was selected as the featured book. Three complimentary titles, The Civil War, by Geoffrey Ward with Ric Burns and Ken Burns; Twelve Years a Slave by Solomon Northup; and Sounder by William H. Armstrong have also been chosen. Cold Mountain will debut on the East Coast with Opera Philadelphia at the Academy of Music on February 5.

According to the Free Library of Philadelphia’s website, “Coinciding with the East Coast premiere of the opera Cold Mountain, composed by Jennifer Higdon and Gene Scheer, the choice of the novel Cold Mountain gives One Book, One Philadelphia a unique opportunity to tie in with another major cultural event. Additionally, our choice provides the inspiration to focus on the Civil War, with all its complexities and ramifications.”

Holy Family University participated in One Book, One Philadelphia last year, reading titles such as Orphan Train by Christina Baker Kline, Rodzina by Karen Cushman, and Locomotive by Brian Floca.

“The point of the program is to bring the Holy Family and Philadelphia communities together through reading, discussing, and participating in programs around a selected theme,” said Kathy Kindness, Assistant Director of Library Services.

Individuals interested in reading the selections can visit the Philadelphia campus library to rent a copy. Classroom sets of the books will also be available. Additionally, a display at the Philadelphia campus and Newtown site will include materials on incorporating topics about slavery and the Civil War into the classroom.

There will be two presentations by Paula Gidjunis ’71, a faculty member at Manor College, at the main campus library. The first, titled “African Americans During the Civil War: The Road to Freedom,” will be held on Wednesday, February 17, from 1:00 pm – 1:50 pm. The second, titled “Women in the Civil War: From the Home Front to the Battlefield,” will take place on Wednesday, March 16, from 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm. Both programs are open to the public.

“Participating in the One Book program is important for a number of reasons,” Kindness said. “First, it connects Holy Family University with the broader intellectual and literary community in Philadelphia. We join ranks with the Free Library branches, Temple University, Drexel University, and area cultural institutions to promote literacy on and off campus. Second, the book titles and programming provide opportunities for our students, faculty, and staff to engage and connect with others in thoughtful ways that go beyond the classroom. Finally, One Book offers us multiple copies of ‘good reads’ for those who just want to kick back on a cold winter's night and ‘walk in another's shoes’ for awhile.”

For more information about Cold Mountain at the Academy of Music, click here.

 

Multi-Talented Andrea Green to Hold Workshop on April 7

 

andrea greenHoly Family University, in conjunction with the School of Education, is excited to announce that Andrea Green, an award-winning musician, music therapist, composer/playwright, and director of children's musicals, will present an interactive workshop and public presentation on the topic of using the arts as a vehicle for teaching tolerance, on April 7.

Green, a Philadelphia native, enjoys national acclaim for creating nine classic Broadway-style children's musicals focusing on inclusiveness, providing a uniquely supportive framework that offers every child of every ability level an important part to play, and delivering heartfelt messages of acceptance

Green will present her model for integrating the arts into teaching and will engage Holy Family University students in a dynamic, illuminating, creative experience during a daytime class. Green will conclude with a two-hour public presentation later that night, exploring how to utilize music to foster tolerance and friendship among children. The public event will take place in the ETC Auditorium from 7-9 pm.

Green’s musical, On the Other Side of the Fence, won the gold medal at the 2015 NY International Film Festival and the bronze medal from the United Nations for “outstanding achievement in a film that exemplifies the ideals and goals of the United Nations.” The musical was also the subject of a documentary that, according to her website, provides “an inspiring, behind-the-scenes look at the process and production of a musical performed by school children as acting and singing partners from the HMS School for Children with Cerebral Palsy and Germantown Friends School in Philadelphia.”

Green and her musical have also won the 2015 Mid-Atlantic Emmy Award for best documentary.

For more information about Andrea Green, visit her website, www.andreagreenmusic.com.