Bonacquisti and McElwaine Publish Teaching Resource for Counseling Skills

Alexa Bonacquisti LinkedIn McElwaine Patrick sizedDrs. Alexa Bonacquisti and Patrick McElwaine, Assistant Professors of Counseling Psychology, have published a teaching resource for the Society for the Teaching of Psychology (STP), Division Two of the American Psychological Association (APA).
The new resource, An Experiential Approach to Teaching Counseling Skills: Instructional Modules for Undergraduate and Graduate Students in Psychology, includes experiential and evidence-based strategies, using role plays, video recordings, and other innovative applications. This project was funded by a 2019 Instructional Resource Award grant.

The STP promotes excellence in the teaching and learning of psychology. The Society provides resources and services, access to a global collaborative community, and opportunities for professional development. The Society also strives to advance the scholarship of teaching and learning, advocate for the needs of teachers of psychology, foster partnerships across academic settings, and increase recognition of the value of the teaching profession. For more information, visit http://teachpsych.org/index.php.

Rosen's Latest Book Studies Corruption in the Americas

Corruption in the AmericasCorruption in the Americas, edited by Jonathan D. Rosen, PhD, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice for Holy Family University, and Hanna S. Kassab, PhD, takes a fresh, comprehensive look at corruption in Latin America. Given the volatility of this region, this book offers a timely assessment, to provide students with a deeper understanding of this complex topic.

Reviewer Nathan P. Jones of Sam Houston State University notes, that “the edited volume has assembled top scholars and think tank researchers to produce a wide-ranging look at corruption in Latin America. With chapters on democratization, state fragility, and corruption in Mexico, Brazil, Bolivia, Guatemala, Peru, and Colombia, no other volume is as comprehensive an assessment of corruption in the region. As Latin America reels from pandemic and widespread criminal violence, the question of corruption is one policymakers and scholars will need to grapple with. This volume will light the way.”

Reviewer Peter Andreas of Brown University states, “Rosen and Kassab have put together a valuable up-to-date collection of case-studies to help us make sense of the corruption of politics and the politics of corruption in the region.

Rosen’s new book, follows the recent publication of Crime, Violence and the State in Latin America, co-authored with Hanna S. Kassab. Both books explore the connection between weak institutions and government policies as well as drug trafficking, organized crime and violence in Latin America. 

Rosen teaches various courses at Holy Family University, where he shares his renown expertise in this arena with students in the Criminal Justice program.

For more information, visit https://rowman.com/ISBN/9781793627223.

Online Options for Graduate Programs are Extensive at Holy Family

Online__Graduate_Programs_scaled.jpgLong before COVID-19 entered our lives, Holy Family University has offered a broad array of masters and doctoral level degree programs in a fully online format. Online graduate programs are designed to meet the needs of busy professionals and others who aspire to advance their careers, but may be unable to attend graduate school on campus.

“We’ve been presenting graduate programs online at Holy Family since 2016, and we continue to expand our portfolio,” said Karen Galardi, EdD, MBA, Dean, Graduate and Professional Studies. “These programs deliver the exceptional quality that’s reflective of our on-campus and blended programs, while allowing the flexibility to accommodate challenging schedules. In the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, we view our online degree options as more valuable than ever.”

Within the School of Education, Holy Family offers both a Master of Education Program (MEd) and a Doctor of Education Program (EdD). Our Master’s program includes initial certification – Pre-K through 4 – for individuals making career changes, as well as additional certifications for current teachers.

Our School of Business Administration offers two online options for graduate students – a Master of Business Administration (MBA), which can be completed in as little as 12 months, and a Master of Business Administration for New Professionals (MBA), which can be completed in just 14 months. GMATs and GREs are not required.

In the School of Nursing and Allied Health Professions, Holy Family offers a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) available to residents of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware. There are two different tracks – the MSN to DNP Leadership Track, which can be completed in as few as five semesters, and the MSN to DNP Leadership Track for the Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN), which can be completed in four semesters with part-time study or three semesters with full-time study.

“Holy Family’s online graduate degree programs provide a rapid path to furthering an individual’s professional and career goals, and at an affordable price,” said Dr. Galardi. “We’re exceedingly proud of the caliber of our online programs, as we are of the countless achievements of those who have earned their graduate and doctoral degrees with us.”

To learn more about online graduate programs at Holy Family, contact Karen Galardi at kgalardi@holyfamily.edu or 267-341-3208.

Griffin Promotes Mental Health Prescription for Criminal Justice Reform

Pat Griffin at Drug Court 1 croppedPatricia Griffin, PhD, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice and Director of the Graduate Criminal Justice program at Holy Family University, has contributed to four new chapters in Changing Times: Transforming the Culture and Behaviors for Law Enforcement. The timely book identifies the components necessary to transform attitudes, behaviors and culture in the interest of diverting the mentally ill out of the criminal justice system and into treatment, where appropriate.

 “Leaders in law enforcement today face unprecedented challenges,” said Griffin. “Among them is the appropriate interaction with the mentally ill. Mishandling results in unwanted headlines, unnecessary expenditures of taxpayer money, and heightened public safety risks. This book provides a pathway to change by providing evidence-based strategies and improved opportunities for engagement with agencies beyond the police that address mental and behavioral health in the community.”

According to the book, “The criminal justice/behavioral health network is large and complex. The effort to divert those in crisis does not fall solely in the domain of a single entity but rather a confluence of different organizations with different cultures, attitudes, and behaviors united in a common goal.”  

The contributors blend theoretical and hands-on experience, enabling the reader to understand the influences of law enforcement’s tradition and other forces that drive attitudes, culture, and behavior, and how to bring about change. Changing Times is recommended for the following audiences:

  • Instructors/students in Criminal Justice programs;
  • Trainers/attendees in Law Enforcement training development programs;
  • Municipal leaders interested in the decriminalization of mental illness; and
  • Researchers interested in the intersection of the Criminal Justice/Mental health system.

    Changing Times Book Cover scaled

The new chapters include:

Griffin, P.M., Salvatore, T.  Framing the environment.  In F. Mielke &C. Kocher (Eds.), Policing and mental health:  Pathways to diversion (Chapter 2).  New York, NY:  Rowman & Littlefield.

Munzo, M., Griffin, P.M. Trauma:  Identification and needs assessment. In F. Mielke &C. Kocher (Eds.), Policing and mental health:  Pathways to diversion (Chapter 5).  New York, NY:  Rowman & Littlefield.

Griffin, P.M., Stocker, D.  Resilience. In F. Mielke &C. Kocher (Eds.), Policing and mental health:  Pathways to diversion (Chapter 7).  New York, NY:  Rowman & Littlefield.

Mielke, F., Griffin, P.M. Emerging theories and processes. In F. Mielke &C. Kocher (Eds.), Policing and mental health:  Pathways to diversion (Chapter 9).  New York, NY:  Rowman & Littlefield.

 

 

HEALTH ADVISORY: Main Campus Open Wednesday, September 2

As a follow up to this morning's health advisory, the University can confirm that we have one positive reported case of COVID-19. As outlined in our Return to Campus plan, we have implemented the appropriate protocols accordingly.

To ensure sufficient time to enact these procedures, including contact tracing, the University will remain closed through Friday, September 4. Contact tracing is being conducted by the Philadelphia Department of Public Health, and is expected to be completed within 48 hours.

In the meantime, all classes will continue to be held in an online format. Faculty and staff will continue to work remotely. All administrative functions will operate on a regular schedule. The Newtown Campus remains open, along with residence halls and the Tiger Cafe.

We know the ongoing ebb and flow of cases will continue to challenge us as a community. Please know that the University is committed to ensuring business continuity and seamless operations as we navigate the pandemic. Our foremost priority remains the health and safety of the Holy Family community, and we thank you for your understanding.

 
Sign Up for Emergency Alerts
If you have not already done so, please sign up to receive emergency alerts through the University’s Emergency Texting System.
 

HEALTH ADVISORY: Newtown Campus Closed - September 21-23

The University has received notification of a confirmed positive case of COVID-19 at the Newtown Campus. As outlined in our Return to Campus Plan, we have implemented the appropriate protocols.
 
The Newtown Campus will be closed from Monday, September 21 through Wednesday, September 23 to allow time to enact all appropriate procedures, including contact tracing, which is currently being conducted.
 
All classes at the Newtown Campus will continue to be held in an online/synchronous format. Faculty and staff at Newtown will work remotely, and all administrative functions will operate on a regular schedule.
 
The Newtown Campus will reopen on Thursday, September 24, with classes and operations resuming in person on campus.
 
The Main Campus was not affected and remains open.
 
Sign Up for Emergency Alerts
If you have not already done so, please sign up to receive emergency alerts through the University’s Emergency Texting System.
 

HEALTH ADVISORY: Main Campus Closed - September 21-23; Update on Fall Classes

The University has received notification of a confirmed positive case of COVID-19 at the Main (Northeast Philadelphia) Campus. As outlined in our Return to Campus Plan, we have implemented the appropriate protocols.
 
The Main Campus will be closed effective immediately on Monday, September 21 through Wednesday, September 23 to allow time to enact all appropriate procedures, including contact tracing and disinfecting, which are currently being conducted.
 
During this period, all classes at the Main Campus will continue to be held in an online/synchronous format. Faculty and staff at the Main Campus will work remotely, and all administrative functions will operate on a regular schedule.
 
Classes for the Remainder of the Fall Semester
As a result of acute but ongoing instances of positive cases of virus, the University has made the decision to transition any classes still being held on our Main and Newtown campus locations to online/synchronous courses.
 
Important Note: The Newtown and Main Campus locations will reopen on Thursday, September 24 for faculty and staff members. At that time, the Science Labs and Simulation labs will return to face-to-face sessions, as these must be conducted in person.
 
The Main Campus Library and the Newtown Campus Library Resource Center will reopen for in-person services beginning September 24. Students are welcome to utilize library resources on campus. The Residence Halls and Tiger Cafe will remain open throughout this time for those students who must remain on campus.
 
Sign Up for Emergency Alerts
If you have not already done so, please sign up to receive emergency alerts through the University’s Emergency Texting System.
 

Jonathan Rosen Publishes Findings on Crime in Latin America

Jonathan D. Rosen, PhD, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice for Holy Family University, continues to explore organized crime in Latin America with the publication of his newest book and an article in a leading academic journal, the Journal of Criminal Justice.

In the book, Crime, Violence and theJonathan Rosen headshot outside State in Latin America, co-authors Jonathan D. Rosen and Hanna Samir Kassab, explore the linkages between weak institutions and government policies designed to combat drug trafficking, organized crime, and violence in Latin America. Using quantitative analysis to examine criminal violence and publicly available survey data from the Latin American Public Opinion Project (LAPOP) to conduct regression analysis, individual case studies on Colombia, Mexico, El Salvador, and Nicaragua highlight the major challenges that governments face and how they have responded to various security issues. Rosen and Kassab later turn their attention to the role of external criminal actors in the region and offer policy recommendations and lessons learned.

The article, “Mara forever? Factors associated with gang disengagement in El Salvador,” published in the Journal of Criminal Justice, studies gang organization in El Salvador and the ways individuals exit the gangs in extremely violent contexts. Rosen, and Co-author José Miguel Cruz, surveyed nearly 1,200 active and former gang members in El Salvador, and conducted 24 interviews with former gang members in rehabilitation programs. Given that gangs play an integral role in the social order in the communities where they are present, it is extremely difficult for gang members to disengage. Their investigation found that incarceration and religious affiliation provide the most critical and safe opportunities to disconnect from a gang.

Rosen is an expert in organized crime, drug trafficking, and security-related issues. Prior to joining the Holy Family University School of Arts and Sciences, Dr. Rosen was a research scientist at Florida International University in Miami and a professor at the University of the Sea (Universidad del Mar), in Oaxaca, Mexico. He is the author and co-author of 19 books, including: The Losing War: Plan Colombia and Beyond, The Criminalization of States: The Relationship between States and Organized Crime, and Colombia's Political Economy at the Outset of the Twenty-First Century: From Uribe to Santos and Beyond.