News

Police Counseling Video Created by HFU Communications Student

philadelphia policeKathryn McCarty, a junior communications major, created a video used by the Philadelphia Police Academy about the Michael the Archangel Ministry program, which offers counseling services to retired and working officers and their families.

The six-minute video’s objective was to inform the public about the counseling services offered. Working with the Fraternal Order of Police, Father Steven Wetzel, OSFS, and officers and affiliates of the program's board, McCarty filmed the video in the fall semester over the course of two months.

“Finishing the video gave me an overwhelming sense of accomplishment,” McCarty said. “Going into my Television and Electronic Media class, I had little experience with shooting video and editing and was impressed with how much I learned. I consider this experience one of the most rewarding projects of my collegiate career.”

According to the video, police officers and their family can receive counseling for a multitude of reasons, including critical police events such as the use of deadly force by or against an officer, domestic emergencies, major events like the Amtrak train derailment, hospitalization of officers, and other crisis situations. Pastoral care is offered at home or in the workplace, and includes on-site and scheduled counseling, hospital visits, bereavement services, and emergency counseling.

“I met new officers and FOP faculty very frequently and they were all so welcoming and supportive,” McCarty said. “It was interesting to watch the video come to life and the process it took. We started out with a rough script and each time we shot something new, we got more excited to see the finished product. I also learned a lot about Michael the Archangel Ministry program and its mission each time we had a new shoot.”

Sad News for the HFU Community (S. Patrice)

Dear Holy Family University community,

It is with tremendous sadness that I let you know that Sister Patrice Feher has passed away. Sister Patrice, former Vice President for Student Services and Dean of Students, has been a cornerstone of the Holy Family University community for decades, and I know that this loss will be felt deeply by all of us. Let's keep her and our community close to your hearts and in our prayers.

Funeral arrangements are as follows:
Saturday, December 3 | Viewing 9:00 am | Mass: 10:00 am
Viewing and Mass are at Nazareth Academy High School's Chapel.


Sister Maureen McGarrity, CSFN
President

Careers Center Implements New Job Posting System

The Holy Family University Careers Center has announced a new job posting system, replacing the email distribution system previously used by the department.

According to Don Brom, Careers Center Director, the new system allows students to make a profile, add a resume and cover letters, and search for the latest jobs by category, type, or company name. Students will also be able to keep track of their saved job searches and the applications they have submitted through this intuitive system.

"The Careers Center advocates that it’s never too early to begin developing a successful vocational plan,” Brom said. “The new Job Posting section located on the Career Centers website will help students connect with employers, post resumes, and apply for jobs within their major. I'm very excited to add this student-centered tool to the list of services offered by the Career Center for the hard working and dedicated students at Holy Family University."

December Art Gallery: John Chang

john changHoly Family University Art Gallery Presents John Chang
Exhibit Dates: December 2-20

Holy Family University is pleased to exhibit a collection of mixed media paintings created by John Chang.

Chang holds an MFA in Visual Art from the College of Art and Design at Lesley University. He also earned a BA in Decorative Arts and Design from Shanghai Light Industry College. Born and raised in Shanghai, China, Chang now resides as an artist in Southern California.

From the artist: “I was born and raised in Shanghai. By the 1980s, Deng Xiaoping initiated a more open door policy, but I still had a deep desire to experience America and Western culture. Immigrating to Boston to study art in graduate school, I discovered a more complex society than I had imagined. Longing for a democratic system, I wasn’t prepared for the magnitude of consumption, both promoted and practiced. The great chasm between Communist China and capitalist America was quite a shock and heightened my awareness of self. Belonging to both worlds and to neither, I recognized the social construction of cultural codes and their impact on identity.”

“Calligraphy expresses the shared space of the personal and the political. Chinese students must devote many years to memorizing several thousand characters. Each character must be written flawlessly and must be both neat and pleasing to the eye, and such rote exercises condition one to submit to authority. In the public square and all walls everywhere, big calligraphic characters were a constant reminder of a collective voice, and so people discounted the empty rhetoric of the official media. Yet in classical Chinese, the script, or shu, is so sacred that it is believed to be capable of affecting change in the natural order of things. By invoking calligraphic forms, I am commenting on the distortion of language, but I am also reclaiming the energy of the written word. Tapping into my ancestral roots, I also use pigments for their symbolic power. For example, black and white are the colors of most ink painting but also represent yin and yang; red and yellow represent happiness, wealth, and health. I consider myself a ‘spiritual escapist.’”

“I am especially interested in making and unmaking meaning with the combination of word and image—particularly in this age of digital communication. Incorporating contemporary events and pop culture, I collect daily newspapers in English and Chinese, cut specific text, graphics and articles, and put them in categories. I also gather post production material from local ad agencies. Influenced by artists like Marcel Duchamp and Andy Warhol, my calligraphic strokes commingle with expressive brushwork and drips, and the freedom of such abstract artists allows me to explore Chinese characters in a personal, reinvigorated way—connecting to and balancing vital energy. The cross-cultural exchange mediated in my creative process continues to unfold and push beyond duality. In merging the beauty of traditional painting technique, modernist performance-like gestures, as well as typography and imagery, I am forging an art that both creates and expresses myself. Embracing the chaos, or ran, I stand hopefully poised between ambivalent remembrance and undetermined tomorrow.”

The event will take place at Holy Family University’s Education Technology Center (ETC) in the lobby and art gallery. Parking is available to all in the Campus Center parking lot in the visitor section without restriction.

This exhibition is part of Holy Family's monthly Gallery shows held throughout the academic year, each of which showcases a new and diverse exhibit featuring artists from around the world as well as Holy Family University's graduating art majors. The intended audiences of this exhibition are people of all ages.

The University Art Gallery is located on the Lower Level of the Education & Technology Center on the University’s Northeast Philadelphia campus. The exhibit is free and open to the public. The Gallery is open Monday through Friday, from 8 am - 8 pm.

Nativity and Tree Lighting Moved to December 1

UPDATE: The First Annual Nativity and Tree Lighting event has been moved to Thursday, December 1 at 7 pm.


On Tuesday, November 29, at 7 pm, Holy Family University will host its First Annual Nativity and Tree Lighting on the lawn in front of Holy Family Hall.

Family, friends, and the entire HFU community are welcome to attend this outdoor event. The night will feature holiday music from the Nazareth Academy High School and Grade School and will culminate with the lighting of the Star of Bethlehem, the Nativity, and the Christmas Tree. Admission is free, and light refreshments and pictures with Santa Tiger will be available.

“As a Catholic institution, we knew we wanted to do something to commemorate the holiday season,” said Staci Altomari, Development and Alumni Operations Specialist. “The lighting of the Nativity, Christmas Tree, and the Star of Bethlehem is a great way to bring the holidays to campus. The tree will be decorated in blue and white roses, which tie into our Christmas Rose tradition. These roses have an additional layer of meaning to our campus, as each rose represents a Blue and White fund donor. We’ll be joined by both the Nazareth Academy High School and Grade School, and there will be a visit from Santa Tiger to take photos with all the children. I encourage everyone to come out and enjoy the festivities.”

Let us know you’re coming by visiting the official event Facebook page!

Holy Family University Unveils New Computer Information Systems Major

Holy Family University has recently unveiled its newest major, Computer Information Systems, as part of the School of Business.

Computer Information Systems is an interdisciplinary program combining business administration and computer science giving a graduate an understanding of how systems work, how to manage them, and how to create them. Students also take courses in the liberal arts to cultivate critical, creative, logical, and ethical thinking which are essential in today’s job market.

The program has three goals, according to Dr. Jan Buzydlowski, Assistant Professor for the School of Business.

“First, students will learn how to proficiently use a variety of computer languages, methodologies, and platforms. Second, they will apply the correct methodologies for the development of systems, and finally, be able to identify and explore future trends within the computing area,” Buzydlowski said. “This program was created as an alternative to a computer science degree, less theoretical, and management information systems degrees, more technical. It allows a student to create a system ranging from an app to a full information system. It also has a focus to keep an eye out for future trends so as to be able to follow them and not become dated. So, in short, students will be facile in a number of programming languages and know system-building elements, such as databases and networks.”

Students will experience classes in Introductory Programming, Advanced Programming, Internet Programming, Human-Computer Interaction, Networking, Systems Analysis, Database Management, and Cyber Security.

“Philadelphia is a hotbed for the information technology sector,” said Dr. Bernice Purcell, Associate Dean and Associate Professor of the School of Business. “Students in our Computer Information Systems major are in an excellent position to secure internships, co-ops, and other useful experience to pair with their degree. The demand for these positions will only continue to grow over time, making this a lucrative degree for students to pursue.”

Holy Family University’s First Annual Nativity and Tree Lighting

NativityTreeLightingOn Tuesday, November 29, at 7 pm, Holy Family University will host its First Annual Nativity and Tree Lighting on the lawn in front of Holy Family Hall.

Family, friends, and the entire HFU community are welcome to attend this outdoor event. The night will feature holiday music from the Nazareth Academy High School and Grade School and will culminate with the lighting of the Star of Bethlehem, the Nativity, and the Christmas Tree. Admission is free, and light refreshments and pictures with Santa Tiger will be available.

“As a Catholic institution, we knew we wanted to do something to commemorate the holiday season,” said Staci Altomari, Development and Alumni Operations Specialist. “The lighting of the Nativity, Christmas Tree, and the Star of Bethlehem is a great way to bring the holidays to campus. The tree will be decorated in blue and white roses, which tie into our Christmas Rose tradition. These roses have an additional layer of meaning to our campus, as each rose represents a Blue and White fund donor. We’ll be joined by both the Nazareth Academy High School and Grade School, and there will be a visit from Santa Tiger to take photos with all the children. I encourage everyone to come out and enjoy the festivities.”

Let us know you’re coming by visiting the official event Facebook page!

Knox Makes Everlasting Connections with Patients in Diligent BSN Fast Track Program

mattknox sized- By Alyssa Reyes ‘18

Caring for hundreds of patients is part of the job description for nurses across the country, but establishing strong bonds with these patients is one of the reasons why Matthew Knox shines. A second degree BSN fast track student at Holy Family University, Knox anticipates to complete his degree in February 2017 and then hit the ground running.

During his clinical experience at St. Mary’s Hospital, Knox was responsible for checking on a maternity patient after aiding in the delivery of her healthy baby boy. She was so touched by his work and dedication that she called Dr. Margaret Harkins, BSN Fast Track Program Coordinator and Assistant Professor, to praise Knox’s work and described him as phenomenal and very caring.

Knox credits part of his success to the environment of Holy Family University and its staff.

“All of the teachers throughout the program have made me feel prepared for the clinical experiences,” Knox said. “There really is a family environment. As a male, it was easy to feel intimidated by my maternity clinical. My classroom teacher, Denise McFadden (RNC-MNN, MSN), and clinical instructor, Lisa Diasio (CRNP), shook away all doubts and made me feel more comfortable. I'm glad they did.”

Knox’s journey in the medical field originally did not begin at Holy Family University. With a previous undergraduate degree in Psychology from Penn State University, he began working as a residential adviser at Foundations Behavioral Health, a long-term mental health facility for adolescents.

“The job taught me that patient care is an environment that I loved,” he said. “I feel very comfortable in therapeutic relationships . There were many difficult conversations with patients and their families. Being successful in these moments always led to positive outcomes.”

To make it through the difficult moments that the profession can present, Knox finds that a sense of humor is important to stay grounded.

“I'm just lucky to have classmates that will sometimes laugh at my mostly terrible jokes,” he said. “Nursing programs and school in general can be very stressful; otherwise, they would probably laugh at more of them. In nursing, you’re often dealing with patients on the worst day of their life. If they are up for it, a good laugh can go a long way to making it slightly better.”

With February around the corner, Knox is thinking about what is next in his career. He still has his foot in the door at the residential psych facility and at Doylestown Hospital, where he currently works as a patient care technician. He knows that he still has some soul searching to do, but even with some uncertainty about what his future will bring, one thing that will follow him wherever his journey takes him is the humbling experience with his patient.

“I will never forget how lucky I was to have such a wonderful patient that would be willing to share this moment with me. It ended up being a life changing experience.”

Gee Presents at 2016 International Symposium on Verbs, Clauses, and Constructions

Dr. Roger Gee, Professor and Director of the Master’s Program in TESOL and Literacy for the School of Education, recently presented at the 2016 International Symposium on Verbs, Clauses, and Constructions. The symposium was held on October 26-28, 2016 at the University of La Rioja, Logroño, Spain.  It was sponsored by The Nerthus Project Research Group (Department of Modern Languages, University of La Rioja) and focused on reports of substantial, original, and unpublished research. His paper was titled, “Semantic Prosody of I/we + past tense + me/us verb constructions.”

“The semantic prosody of a lexical item may be defined as the negative or positive associations of other words or phrases that co-occur with the lexical item, and the tendency is for semantic prosody to be negative,” Gee said. “The research I reported investigated the semantic prosody of the I/we + past tense + me/us verb construction for ditransitive high-frequency verbs that carry a possessive or obtaining sense. The Corpus of Contemporary American English (COCA) was used to locate 165 singular tokens of the verb construction and 81 tokens of the plural construction. For the singular construction, 86 percent had a positive semantic prosody, and for the plural construction, 60 percent had a positive semantic construction.”

School of Business Administration Presents at NABET Conference

Dr. Jan Buzydlowski, Assistant Professor, Dr. Don Goeltz, Associate Professor, and Dr. Bernice Purcell, Associate Dean and Associate Professor of the School of Business Administration, presented at the 39th Annual Northeastern Associate of Business, Economics, and Technology (NABET) Conference on October 27-28 in State College, Pa.

The Northeastern Association of Business, Economics, and Technology, formerly known as The Association of Pennsylvania University Business and Economics Faculty, originated in the late 1970s, providing an opportunity for interested economics and business professors to meet and discuss their research and controversial issues in business education and in the state government of Pennsylvania. NABET offers opportunities, primarily in the Northeastern states, for the faculty of colleges and universities to engage in the exchange of their research by presentation at the NABET Conference.

Dr. Buzydlowski presented with James Pomykalski of Susquehanna University. Their presentation, “Comparing and Contrasting Systems Analysis Methodologies with Data Analytic Frameworks,” described the parallels between the systems development lifecycle and similar lifecycles common for data mining and data-exploration systems for the purpose of developing a hybrid methodology and supporting modeling tools for a more comprehensive and rich developmental environment for data analytics.

Dr. Don Goeltz and Dr. Bernice Purcell presented a paper in process entitled “Critical Thinking in Capstone Courses.” Their presentation detailed their efforts to judge course inputs—particularly textbooks—with regard to how well the texts support development of critical thinking capabilities in students.

“This conference is a growing regional conference that provides a chance to present to our peers from colleges and universities similar to ours,” the group said. “The collegiality, sharing of experiences, and opportunity to learn from each other made this an excellent experience."

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